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Events & News

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Upcoming Events

Community Meetings

The Louisiana Coastal Protection and Restoration Authority is hosting a series of open-house style meetings for specific communities near the proposed Mid-Barataria Sediment Diversion to share information and get feedback on the project and proposed mitigation measures in an informal setting. These meetings are not an opportunity to submit official public comment.

Open House on Mississippi River Sediment Diversion Projects • 10/13/2021, 4:00 PM

1141 Bayview Avenue, Biloxi, Mississippi, 39501

The Louisiana Coastal Protection and Restoration Authority (CPRA) will host an open house-style meeting in Biloxi, Mississippi, to share information on Louisiana’s proposed Mid-Barataria and Mid-Breton Sediment Diversion projects, as well as answer questions from the public.

The meeting will be held on Wednesday, Oct. 13 from 4 p.m. to 5:30 p.m. at 1141 Bayview Ave, Biloxi, Mississippi, in the first-floor auditorium of the Bolton Building. Members of the public are invited to attend a brief presentation from the Mid-Basin Sediment Diversion program team, followed by a question-and-answer session with CPRA. The public is encouraged to attend the presentation to hear background information, project details, permitting process information, and timelines.

Questions will be submitted via comment card, read aloud, and addressed by the CPRA team. The meeting will serve as an opportunity to share information on the projects’ progress and provide Mississippi stakeholders with an opportunity to engage with the engineers and technical team members working on the project.

Participants can also join virtually via Zoom. Online participants will not be able to submit questions. 

https://itsmsgov.zoom.us/j/81250643812?pwd=VVJQNXoweFNYSWk0VEszYnlBNG9vZz09

Passcode: 674616
Or Telephone:
Dial: USA (888) 822-7517 US Toll-free
Conference code: 4564198

In accordance with the Mississippi State Department of Health, the following protocols are recommended while in attendance:

  • Get a COVID-19 vaccination if you are eligible.

  • Wear a mask in all indoor public settings, even if you are vaccinated.

  • If you are 65 years of age or older, you should avoid all indoor mass gatherings, even if you have been vaccinated.

  • If you have a chronic medical condition, you should avoid all indoor mass gatherings, even if you have been vaccinated.

The Mid-Basin Sediment Diversion Program, comprised of the Mid-Barataria and Mid-Breton Sediment Diversions, is a critical component of Louisiana’s Coastal Master plan and the largest coastal restoration effort ever undertaken by the State of Louisiana.

The two projects, both in the Engineering & Design phase, represent an effort to address Louisiana’s land loss crisis through engineering with nature to mimic natural land building processes and restore Louisiana’s coastal habitat. Both projects are currently undergoing a robust, federally driven permitting and review process led by the United States Army Corps of Engineers.

For more information, visit midbasin.coastal.la.gov.

Media Contact
Rachel Haney, Communications Director

P.O. Box 44027
Baton Rouge, LA 70804-4027
225.342.7615
rachel.haney@la.gov


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Poll Finds Louisiana Voters Concerned About Climate Change

WWNO • 8/17/2021, 12:00 AM

Seventy percent of the roughly 1,000 people polled by Global Strategy Group (GSG) and the Environmental Defense Fund (EDF) in July said coastal flooding and hurricanes were affecting them and their families. Residents of Plaquemines and St. Bernard parishes were especially concerned.

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Coastal Louisianans support sediment diversions

Dredging Today • 8/16/2021, 12:00 AM

There is widespread support for action to address Louisiana’s urgent land loss crisis through sediment diversions, Restore the Mississippi River Delta reports.

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Two thirds of southeast Louisiana voters already feel effects of climate change, poll says

nola.com • 8/13/2021, 12:00 AM

Two thirds of southeast Louisiana voters say they feel the effects of climate change, and even more agree that its stronger hurricanes, more intense rains and increased coastal flooding carry serious consequences for the state, according to a new poll for the Environmental Defense Fund.

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A miniature model of the Mississippi River and the fight to save coastal Louisiana

The Denver Channel • 8/9/2021, 12:00 AM

Beneath the surface of the water, the earth is constantly churning. Nothing can slow the speed or power of the Mississippi River as it flows across the United States and into the Gulf of Mexico.

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Our Views: Build the Barataria diversion project to help preserve our coastline

The Advocate • 8/2/2021, 12:00 AM

Even as America funded and built a giant levee system in the wake of the 1927 flood, it was recognized that the Mississippi River’s role in distributing sediment to build land at the foot of the delta would be forever changed.

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King Milling: Billy Nungesser should focus on big needs of Louisiana, not local politics

The Advocate • 8/2/2021, 12:00 AM

For 25 years, the state of Louisiana has remained miles ahead of the rest of the nation and the world in its approach to the crisis on our coast — thanks to its success in holding detractors like Lt. Gov. Billy Nungesser at bay. The collective wisdom and experience of the world’s leading scientists and engineers, not the whims of politicians, has been the basis of every decision made by the coastal program, and we are all the better for it. No one, elected or not, should be allowed to make light of or steer us away from the fundamentals of the challenge in front of us.

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This Ambitious Project Aims to Rebuild Louisiana's Vanishing Coastal Wetlands

Audubon • 7/8/2021, 12:00 AM

An influx of Mississippi River sediment promises to provide vital bird habitat and hurricane protection, but not without disrupting livelihoods.

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OPINION: It’s time to lend your voice to the coastal conversation

The Lens • 7/2/2021, 12:00 AM

As a native New Orleanian, my entire life has been shaped by water. I was born in this city, whose culture and way of life are intricately connected to water and our natural coastal resources. My life with water continues as the Executive Director of the Water Collaborative. I work every day with partners across the city and the region to create and support solutions for everyone impacted by flood risks. We focus on equitable practices to sustainably live and thrive with water.

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A quick guide to Louisiana’s largest coastal project

FOX 8 Live • 6/14/2021, 12:00 AM

NEW ORLEANS (WVUE) - Louisiana’s controversial proposed $2 billion plan to divert a portion of the Mississippi River into the marsh south of Belle Chasse can tough to digest. Here is a quick guide to the largest-ever coastal restoration project.

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Building more climate resilient future for Louisiana’s coast

Dredging Today • 6/4/2021, 12:00 AM

Louisiana’s Barataria Basin has experienced some of the highest rates of land loss on the planet: Between 1932 to 2016, the region lost nearly 295,000 acres of land, displacing communities, threatening critical infrastructure and jobs, and decimating formerly diverse and abundant wildlife habitat.

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John Bel Edwards: We need the Mid-Barataria diversion to help save our coast

The Advocate • 6/3/2021, 12:00 AM

If there’s one thing most Louisianans agree on, it is this: the value and necessity of restoring and protecting our coast. For decades, we’ve taught our schoolchildren about the dire land loss crisis we face as a state. And for the first time, our coastal program is making major, tangible progress in our fight to restore much of what’s been lost.

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Scientists Express Support for Mid-Barataria Sediment Diversion

Biz New Orleans • 6/3/2021, 12:00 AM

A group of more than 55 natural and physical scientists, engineers and social scientists with a combined 1,300 years of research and technical experience related to Louisiana’s coast have co-authored and signed a letter voicing support based on their scientific knowledge and expertise for the Mid-Barataria Sediment Diversion, an ecosystem restoration project. The group’s collective interdisciplinary work has informed the state’s efforts on the Louisiana Coastal Master Plan and other coastal restoration and protection efforts.

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John Bel Edwards: We need the Mid-Barataria diversion to help save our coast

The Advocate • 6/2/2021, 12:00 AM

If there’s one thing most Louisianans agree on, it is this: the value and necessity of restoring and protecting our coast. For decades, we’ve taught our schoolchildren about the dire land loss crisis we face as a state. And for the first time, our coastal program is making major, tangible progress in our fight to restore much of what’s been lost.

Read More

Scientists Express Support for Mid-Barataria Sediment Diversion

Biz New Orleans • 6/1/2021, 12:00 AM

NEW ORLEANS (press release) — A group of more than 55 natural and physical scientists, engineers and social scientists with a combined 1,300 years of research and technical experience related to Louisiana’s coast have co-authored and signed a letter voicing support based on their scientific knowledge and expertise for the Mid-Barataria Sediment Diversion, an ecosystem restoration project. The group’s collective interdisciplinary work has informed the state’s efforts on the Louisiana Coastal Master Plan and other coastal restoration and protection efforts.

Read More

See interactive timeline of Mid-Barataria Sediment Diversion project's history

nola.com • 6/1/2021, 12:00 AM

Conservationists, businesspeople, residents and politicians have been wringing their hands for decades over Louisiana's fragile coast. One proposal, diverting part of the Mississippi River into the Barataria Basin, dates from 1925, and is gaining steam now. This interactive timeline illustrates some of the major developments.

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These six factors explain why Louisiana is rapidly losing land; see graphics

nola.com • 6/1/2021, 12:00 AM

Land loss in parts of Louisiana is occurring at a rate equivalent to one football field every 100 minutes. How is that happening? Here are the main reasons Louisiana’s coast is disappearing and has become more susceptible to erosion and storms, and why projects like the Mid-Barataria Sediment Diversion plan to reverse some of the losses.

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Here's why Mississippi River diversion was proposed, how it might work

nola.com • 6/1/2021, 12:00 AM

Picture an hourglass lying on its side, the top resting in the Mississippi River to capture the sands of time floating downstream from the Midwest. The sand flows through the neck of the hourglass and empties into Barataria Basin, where scientists predict it will create and nourish freshwater marshes and saltwater wetlands to stave off an expected dramatic loss of Louisiana’s coast over the next 50 years.

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Mark Davis: More than past time to move with Mid-Barataria diversion

The Advocate • 5/24/2021, 12:00 AM

Coastal Louisiana is in trouble. The state’s once vast system of coastal wetlands and estuaries has shrunk by more than 1,800 square miles and more loss is on the way. We can debate the causes for that, but what is not debatable is that our state is disappearing fast and our options for keeping any significant part of it are extremely limited.

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Shrinking wetlands put communities and cultures at risk

The West Side Journal • 5/21/2021, 12:00 AM

Last year, I had the opportunity to board a small plane and fly over Louisiana’s coast. Taking off from the New Orleans Lakefront Airport, recognizable landmarks like the Louisiana Superdome quickly faded into the background, and in only 20-30 minutes, we were flying over open water. We often hear that our wetlands are vanishing, but to see firsthand how sparse they are is shocking. Communities in South Louisiana are the poster children for climate change, and our state’s future is at a pivotal turning point. For decades, we’ve been losing land at an alarming rate from coastal erosion, sea-level rise and other threats.

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Louisiana’s Best Shot: Restoring the Coast by Working With Nature

NWF.org • 5/18/2021, 12:00 AM

When most people recall the Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill disaster, they remember picture after picture of oil-covered marshes, pelicans, sea turtles, and other wildlife. Many of those pictures were from the Barataria Basin in Louisiana, which received heavy oiling and is often referred to as Ground Zero for the spill.

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‘There’s no alternative’: Louisiana’s ambitious plan to stay above water

Grist • 3/16/2021, 12:00 AM

Louisiana has never been hard to pinpoint on a map — it’s the only state in the U.S. that looks like a giant boot. At least it did, before the ocean swallowed the carbon emissions belched out by industrializing nations and began to swell. Now, the boot is losing a football field of land every hour to the rising tide.

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Guest column: River diversion important to Louisiana coast

Houma Today • 3/16/2021, 12:00 AM

As a fourth generation Louisianaian living in the Barataria Basin for my entire life, some of my fondest memories involve trapping, hunting, fishing and alligatoring with my grandfather, father, siblings, and now my own sons and grandchildren. But this way of life and Louisiana’s bounty -- its fisheries, wildlife habitat, and abundant natural resources -- are at risk of complete collapse without large-scale coastal restoration projects like the Mid-Barataria Sediment Diversion.

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Big Step Forward for $50 Billion Plan to Save Louisiana Coast

The New York Times • 3/12/2021, 12:00 AM

The next phase of a $50 billion plan to protect the Louisiana coast from erosion and rising sea levels has cleared an important hurdle, with the Army Corps of Engineers delivering a long-awaited environmental impact statement for a key part of the project. The report, issued Thursday evening, looked at a proposal to punch a hole in the Mississippi River levee. The corps said the move would largely benefit coastal areas in the state, though it might also affect some marine life, especially bottlenose dolphins, and could cause problems for those who make their living from raising and catching seafood in the area.

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Here's how to make your voice heard on Mid-Barataria Sediment Diversion project

nola.com • 3/10/2021, 12:00 AM

At $2 billion, the Mid-Barataria Sediment Diversion project is a key piece of Louisiana's 50-year, $50 billion to protect and restore its retreating coastline. The Army Corps of Engineers has released its draft environmental impact statement on the project, and the Louisiana Trustee Implementation Group of the BP Deepwater Horizon Natural Resource Damage Assessment Team has issued its restoration plan. Public comments are being accepted jointly on both.

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Coastal chief: Louisiana needs big diversion projects to restore wetlands

The Advocate • 3/9/2021, 12:00 AM

Most Louisianans can recite our state’s land loss statistics as quickly as they can recall their home addresses — “a football field of land lost every 100 minutes.” And while outsiders may think it strange, this ominous figure has become an increasingly ordinary dinner table discussion. So much so that some have become desensitized to what they're actually saying ― that our land is quite literally vanishing from the map ― a phenomenon that is anything but ordinary.

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Mid-Barataria sediment diversion project up for comment

Dredging Today • 3/8/2021, 12:00 AM

The single largest ecosystem restoration project in U.S. history reached a significant milestone last week when the Army Corps released the Draft Environmental Impact Statement (DEIS) for the Mid-Barataria Sediment Diversion.

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Study marks major milestone for Louisiana coastal plan

New Orleans City Business • 3/8/2021, 12:00 AM

A nearly $2 billion plan to divert water and sediment from the Mississippi River to rebuild land in southeastern Louisiana — considered the cornerstone of the state’s efforts to protect its rapidly eroding coast — has passed a major milestone with the publication of the long-awaited Army Corps of Engineers environmental impact study.

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Louisiana Coastal Plan Passes Major Milestone

The Weather Channel • 3/6/2021, 12:00 AM

The Army Corps of Engineers has completed an environmental impact study on a nearly $2 billion plan to help Louisiana's rapidly eroding coastline. The report, released Thursday, is considered a major milestone in the effort to divert water and sediment from the Mississippi River to rebuild land in southeastern Louisiana.

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Supporters of Louisiana’s largest coastal project welcome the findings in a new federal report

FOX 8 • 3/5/2021, 12:00 AM

NEW ORLEANS (WVUE) - The largest coast restoration project in U.S. history, the Mid-Barataria Sediment Diversion, reached a milestone with the publishing of a required federal environmental study. The Draft Environmental Impact Statement finds that, at its peak in the year 2050, the project would have built or sustained 28 square miles of marsh in Barataria Bay.

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'Man, let's go!': Environmental groups cheer release of river diversion report in Louisiana

nola.com • 3/5/2021, 12:00 AM

Environmental groups are breathing a collective sigh of relief now that a decades-in-the-making assessment of Louisiana's largest-ever coastal restoration project has been released. A U.S. Army Corps of Engineers draft environmental impact statement may not sound exciting, but it is the culmination of a long, complex review process that several environmental groups say will get the proposed Mid-Barataria Sediment Diversion to the finish line.

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Corps Report Sets Stage for $1.4B Wetlands Restoration Project

Engineering News-Record • 3/5/2021, 12:00 AM

The proposed $1.4 billion project to rebuild Louisiana’s coastal wetlands reached a critical milestone in its permitting process March 5, when the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers released its draft report detailing the project’s environmental impact. The consensus among state officials and experts is that the benefits are well worth the risk.

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Louisiana Trustees Seek Comments on Proposed Mid-Barataria Sediment Diversion

NOAA • 3/5/2021, 12:00 AM

The Louisiana Trustee Implementation Group is seeking public input on a draft restoration plan proposing an investment of up to $2 billion in the Mid-Barataria Sediment Diversion project. If approved, the large-scale project would reconnect the Mississippi River to Louisiana’s Barataria Basin. The project will allow the controlled release of freshwater, nutrients and sediment back into the basin to rebuild wetlands and contribute to the broader restoration of its ecosystem.

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Comments sought for the Mid-Barataria Sediment Diversion Draft Environmental Impact Statement

USACE • 3/5/2021, 12:00 AM

NEW ORLEANS – The Coastal Protection and Restoration Authority of Louisiana (CPRA) has applied to the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers for permits and permission to construct, maintain and operate the Mid-Barataria Sediment Diversion project on the west bank of the Mississippi River in Plaquemines Parish.

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Major Milestone Reached for Mid-Barataria Sediment Diversion: Draft Restoration Plan Released

Garret Graves • 3/5/2021, 12:00 AM

WASHINGTON, DC – U.S. Congressman Garret Graves (South Louisiana) released the following statement after the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers released its Draft Environmental Impact Statement (DEIS) and the Louisiana Trustee Implementation Group (LA TIG) concurrently released its Draft Restoration Plan for the Mid-Barataria Sediment Diversion.

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Huge Louisiana coastal project receives positive report from the Corps of Engineers

nola.com • 3/4/2021, 12:00 AM

One of the most expensive, ambitious and controversial proposals in Louisiana’s 50-year, $50 billion bid to save the southern third of the state from disappearing like a modern-day Atlantis passed a major milestone Thursday night with the release of a mostly positive assessment from the Army Corps of Engineers.

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